SJDM 2013: InDecision team recommends…

SJDM toronto picGreetings from Toronto and the annual conference for the Society for Judgment and Decision Making! With the help of the InDecision team, we’ll be covering the best bits of the conference for you if you couldn’t make it (and even if you are here, we’ll have something for you, too). With dozens of great sessions on offer this weekend, choice overload is pretty much guaranteed. But fear not: we’ve scoured the program and selected the best ones to help you make the most of the conference. Here’s where you’ll find the InDecision team this weekend…

caroline new resizedCaroline’s picks

Research and Academia (Session #7) Questionable research practices. Misunderstanding or misuse of statistics. Lack of reproducibility. Many academic fields are currently going through several research-related crises and controversies. Different solutions are being proposed to improve the ways we conduct research, but I sometimes find it hard to keep up with all the suggested improvements for our different research practices. That is why I am always looking forward to conference sessions that can help me stay up to date with the most recent developments. The four papers presented in the session cover important issues, such as the replicabilitiy and reliability of behavioral research findings, and, most importantly, provide interesting solutions that I am really looking forward to learning more about. How to find it: Sunday, November 17, 2:45-4:15 pm, Civic South

The Relationship Between Altruism and Personal Benefits (Session #4) The existence of altruism, or whether humans can ever transcend self-interest, is an age-old question that is constantly being debated across different fields. It is a debate that I find quite interesting, so I am always drawn to conference sessions that provide new ideas, or revisit old ones, on the topic. I find this session particularly interesting because it explores the interplay between altruism and personal benefit and provides interesting findings about how perceived self-interested motives or outcomes can taint the judgment of seemingly altruistic behavior, among others. I am really looking forward to learning more about how this impacts people’s judgment and performance of altruistic or prosocial behavior, and whether there are any ways to overcome these effects. How to find it: Saturday, November 16, 3:15-4:45 pm, Simcoe/Dufferin

elina resizedElina’s picks

Applying Behavioral Economics in the Field: Nudging Customers to Pay their Credit Card Dues The fact that this session is talking about a large-scale field experiment makes this session unmissable for me to two reasons. The primary reason is that for me field experiments represent an exciting new phase for the field itself: after years spent in the lab it’s time to migrate to the outside world to see how our ideas perform in reality. It’s risky because we can’t control everything so the level of noise is likely to be high, and we have to find partners for it which brings its own complications. This bridge between academia and practice is one that I feel we need to cross to ensure the relevance of our work to the outside world, which ultimately defines the value of our work through funding. On a personal level I’m also interested in hearing about the practical challenges of running such studies as it’s close to my own research interests both as a PhD student and practitioner so I’m hoping to get some great ideas and inspiration from this talk. How to find it: Saturday 16th November, 3.15-4.45pm, Session #4 Track Ι: Choice Architecture 2 – Willow East

The Impact of Comparison Frames and Category Width On Strength of Preferences This session is definitely one I’ll be listening to with my practitioner hat on: understanding the strength of consumers’ preferences is at the heart of my work as a market research consultant. We know already that how options are presented to people changes how they perceive them, but when it comes to a real-life client scenario, it’s absolutely crucial to understand the nuances of how consumers make these comparisons to help advise our clients to emphasise the right attributes of a product. This might seem manipulative or even sinister, but just think for a moment about a product you really like: what if the “wrong” communication would have meant you’d never discovered that product? How to find it: Monday 18th November, 9.45-11.15am, Session #8 Track 2: Consumer Decision Making – Civic South

leigh resizedLeigh’s picks

Are risk and delay psychologically equivalent? Testing a common process account of risky and inter-temporal choice Research that unifies previously disparate effects is always interesting to me – because my instinct as a mathematician is to work towards ever more general and simpler (and therefore more powerful) models. If inter-temporal choice can be explained by the same process as probabilistic decisions, it takes us one step closer to understanding decisions in a coherent way. And this does seem a logical step: some accounts explain hyperbolic discounting as a rational response to the riskiness of a delayed reward – maybe if I hold off on eating the marshmallow and wait to get two of them, some unknown event will intervene and I won’t get any! However, it seems that these researchers have found evidence to counter this unification. I’ll be intrigued to hear what alternatives they put forward. How to find it: Saturday 16th November, 8.30-10am, Session #1 Track 2: Risk 1 – Essex

Partitioning option menus to nudge single-item choice This talk is interesting for me both for my consulting work with some commercial clients, and also because it feels like it could help understand how we compose small intermediate steps into larger decisions. Many complex decisions have various parts, and forcing people to unpack those individual steps (for instance by listing individual options separately rather than allowing people to integrate them into one bigger choice) may reveal some of the internal processes that are not directly observable. Classical decision theory (as used in rational economic modelling) assumes that separate choices can simply be added up to come to an overall totality of decisions, but the results of this paper seem to provide more confirmation that this doesn’t work. Seeing the differences between low-level and high-level choices may help us figure out a better way to put individual decisions together in a model and predict social behaviour. How to find it: Saturday 16th November, 10.30am-12pm, Session #2 Track 1 Choice Architecture 1 – Willow East

shereen resizedShereen’s picks

As a behavioral decision researcher, I am interested in finding behavioral solutions to policy-relevant problems. Indeed, I learned at APPAM this past weekend that there is a lot of room for behavioral research in the policy arena. With that in mind when looking at the SJDM program, I am focusing on talks that (1) investigate the practical elements that influence choice, or (2) identify either a behavioral problem or behavioral solution in a policy-relevant domain. For now, the talks in choice architecture (both of them) and financial decision-making are on the top of my list.

The first session on choice architecture addresses abstract but broadly relevant topics in choice architecture. These talks seem key to understanding basic concepts in this area such as defaults and choice sets. The second session on choice architecture delves into more area-specific interventions on choice and their effectiveness. These choice architecture talks have more direct relevance for policy, marketing, or other applications. With the recent formation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) in 2011, it is clear that policy-makers are concerned about the way people make financial decisions. The talks in the financial decision-making session speak directly to this concern with a series of experiments that either identify the obstacles people face in considering their finances and/or provide some way to mitigate these problems.

How to find them: Choice Architecture I – (Saturday, Nov 16, Track I, Session #2, 10:30am-11:50am); Choice Architecture II –  (Saturday, Nov 16, Track I, Session #4, 3:15pm-4:35pm); Financial Decision Making – (Saturday, Nov 16, Track III, Session #5, 5:15pm – 6:35pm)

troy resizedTroy’s picks

Cruel nature: Harmfulness as an overlooked dimension in judgments of moral standing “Cruel Nature” promises to be a great talk and not just because of its slick title. The talk will tackle an already controversial topic (the basis of morality) and throw an additional wrench into the puzzle (people respond to animals with moral emotions). The talk will be big in scope, have a good literature review, and will to lend itself to fiery conversation (or at least that’s how the talk played out when it was presented in multi-school Moral Research Lab). Piazza and colleagues propose that “harmful intent cannot be reducible to agency.” They use scenario studies featuring non human subjects like sharks to test and show this. This talk will ultimately try to critique the Agency-Patient model of morality, a model that is already a very new critique of also still relatively new Moral Foundations model of morality. With sharks, controversy and morality, even if you disagree with the speakers’ claims (and probably many people will), you’re guaranteed to have a good time. How to find it: Saturday 16th November, 1.30-3pm, Session #3 Track Ι: Morality and Ethics 1 – Willow East

Selfish or selfless? On the signal value of emotion in altruistic behavior This talk promises to be fascinating as it shows that the general populace holds a view of morality that widely differs from the view of morality most academics hold. Us ‘rational’ academics tend to think about morality like a math equation, where people sacrifice for others and don’t get any benefits – e.g. gifts or feeling a positive “helpers’ high” emotion. However, Barasch and colleagues show this is not the case. People actually think feeling a “helpers’ high” is a authentic signal of concern for others and are suspicious of the unemotional helper (e.g. the person many academics praise). The researchers do however show a boundary of this attribution which can help us understand where people in general see the line between selfish and selflessness in helping. How to find it: Saturday 16th November, 3:15-4:45 pm, Session #4 Track 3.

[N.B. Please check all session and presentation times in the official program before attending as typos may have slipped in!]

Final notes…

  • We’re covering the conference here (with a delay) as well as on Twitter both through @InDecision_Blog and our individual contributors: @RouxCaroline, @infomagpie, @leighblue and @troyhcampbell – conference hashtag is #sjdm2013
  • Don’t miss the Graduate Student Social Event on Saturday 16th from 6.45-8.45pm at the Willow Centre!
  • The InDecision dinner (featuring talks with three practitioners) on Saturday 16th still has 4 places left – please email elina@theirrationalagency.com asap if you want to join!
  • If you have any feedback on the blog or would like to get involved, please come speak to us – we’d love to hear from you!
Advertisements

Want to say something?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s